Blog

MAY 2017

24/05
They fly!
Several falcons from the cathedral and the Saint Job church have taken their first flight.
23/05
61 species on the menu!
Peregrine falcons are super predators – predators on top of the food chain. They are excellent aerial hunters, that almost exclusively catch birds in full flight.
21/05
Ready for takeoff in Brussels and Uccle
The falcons of the cathedral in Brussels and the Saint Job church in Uccle are almost ready for their first flight! They are entering their sixth week, that is when a Peregrine falcon is fully grown.
17/05
Scolding and thunder
Slowly but surely, the 7 young falcons (3 at the cathedral and 4 in Uccle) finish growing. They all came out of the egg during the week of April 10th, so they will soon begin the their sixth and final week in the nest.
15/05
Pellets!
Peregrine falcons are amazing bird hunters, that is clear to everyone now.
10/05
6 eggs!
The female Peregrine falcon in the Notre Dame church in Laken broods on 6 eggs! A new record? Probably not, but it is still an interesting yet mysterious case.
08/05
A Budgerigar, yum!
The Peregrine falcon is not just a predator – he is a super predator! That doesn’t mean he is the greatest, but rather that he is on top of the food chain. In other words: he doesn’t have little or no natural enemies.
05/05
Video: The Uccle falcons were ringed
The chicks in the cathedral and the town house in Schaerbeek were ringed on May 1st. On Friday, the 4 little falcons in the Saint Job church in Uccle were next.
04/05
News from Woluwe-Saint-Pierre
Yesterday, 30 people came to Woluwe-Saint-Pierre to observe the Peregrine Falcons on their nest on the town house tower. Evidently, they talked about what happened this year: things went wrong in the nest. But what is it about?
02/05
1 female – 2 males
The 3 little falcons of the cathedral were ringed this morning. The technique includes putting a metal ring engraved with a unique code around the leg. This code consists of one letter and several numbers, combined with the address of the scientific institute of the concerning country. In Belgium, the study is conducted by the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences. So, the rings are engraved with the inscription ‘museum sciences nat Brussels’.

APRIL 2017

25/04
Update on the nesting season of the Brussels Peregrine falcons: part 2
The Notre Dame church in Laeken is home to a Peregrine falcon couple at least since 2011. Last year, it was not a success. A first female laid 4 eggs but she was replaced by another falcon from the Netherlands. The exact origin of the falcon could not be determined, because the code on her ring was not fully deciphered.
21/04
The latest news from the Brussels Peregrine falcon couples
Let’s make a tour around the 12 monitored couples from Brussels, now that the chicks in the cathedral are 10 days old.
18/04
What is going on in Woluwe-Saint-Pierre?
The Peregrine pair in Woluwe-Saint-Pierre has lost its two chicks in only a couple of hours. The male and the female still take turns brooding on the two remaining eggs, but chances are very slim that they will hatch.
14/04
Come and see!
Observing the peregrine falcons via streaming is good, but observing them « in real life » is even better!
13/04
How can you distinguish between the male and the female Peregrine falcon?
The difference between the male and the female is there, but it is subtle. Let’s take our binoculars!
12/04
Surprise in Uccle!
The Peregrine pair that nests in Uccle in the clock tower of the St. Job Church, is the newcomer in the observation network of falcons in Brussels.
11/04
Then there were two!
Today, the two first falcons have hatched at the cathedral.
10/04
Hatching has begun in the cathedral!
We didn’t have to wait long, because a first young falcon has started to come out of his egg on top of the St. Michael and St. Gudula Cathedral in the centre of Brussels.
05/04
A new flight
Brussels has been the home of 12 Peregrine falcon couple for several years now. An exceptional opportunity! We have decided to set up a true observation network, to discover multiple falcon families simultaneously and in detail. This spring, we look at three of them!
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